Tag Archives: Sports

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5 easy ways to boost your heart health

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Making positive changes to help your cardiovascular system doesn’t necessarily always mean grueling exercise and eating even more kale.

Sometimes, the simplest moves are just the ticket for seeing meaningful improvements in your numbers. Try the following tricks:

Get real with your Fitbit.

USC researchers report that when asked how much exercise they get on a daily basis, people rarely answer accurately. Americans typically rate themselves as very active, for example, when as high as 60 percent of that subject group were proven to be inactive through fitness tracking devices.

The moral of this story: your Fitbit doesn’t lie. Pay attention to your actual mileage logged if you monitor steps throughout your workday, and move more if you need to.

Skip the drive-thru on your way home from work.

A study from the Medical College of Georgia at Augustafound that drinking just one milkshake made with whole milk, ice cream and whipped cream was enough to turn healthy red blood cells into spiky cells, which are a key risk for a cardiovascular event like a heart attack.

What’s more, the risk to your heart after consuming a high-fat drink or food lasts for a full four hours, causing an immune response in your body that’s similar to an infection. The researchers think this could explain rare reports of sudden death after people with heart disease eat a single high-fat meal.

The take-home: an occasional rich treat is probably OK, but don’t make a habit of taxing your heart by eating this way all the time.

Don’t break your daily diet into small portions.

It’s previously been thought that eating six small meals plus two snacks was a great way to lose weight, but researchers at Tel Aviv University now recommend eating on the following schedule: a big breakfast, an average lunch, a small dinner, and no snacking at all.

Their research concluded that this new eating schedule controlled hunger better than more frequent eating, and provided better glucose control and balance — participants during the duration of their study dropped 11 pounds as opposed to 3 pounds dropped by those eating six meals a day. Health improvements happened after only two weeks on the new schedule, too.

Listen to music after you take your blood pressure meds.

Research finds that classical music in particular lowers your heart rate, reduces arterial pressure and positively activates your body’s parasympathetic system — all of which helps your body absorb the medication better. Using Beethoven as your office soundtrack might just create the calming environment you need overall to do your best work, too — give it a try!

Be optimistic.

Research from the American College of Cardiology found that positive thinkers have a great chance of improving their heart health, because optimism allows you to better and more enthusiastically plan a healthy diet, make time for exercise, and reject stress. Practice seeing the glass half full — it will not only help your heart, but open up new possibilities in your work life as well!

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Study: Mobile health apps used by millions but effectiveness is lacking

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There’s an app for seemingly everything to help us live better healthier lives, but it seems the outcomes of these apps show little evidence of positive prognoses. Perhaps the best way to describe these digital health tools is that they have a big hat but no cattle.

According to a study published by Health Affairs, even though the developers of the technologies study their effectiveness, these studies “rarely used randomized controlled trials, depended on small study populations and generally focused on healthier individuals.”

The authors of the study said they looked for evidence of clinical effectiveness through use of the apps or a “demonstrable improvement for a relevant health diagnosis.” Per FierceHealthcare reporting, digital health firms can verify their own measurements, citing their ability that an activity tracker can accurately count steps, but aren’t able to prove the solutions help a patient struggling with weight, for example.

“We had a fairly high bar for demonstrating evidence, but in many ways in medicine it’s the standard bar, which is clinical trials of sorts, and right now our sense is that the digital health community doesn’t really have to meet that bar, particularly when they’re going direct to consumer,” Adam Cohen, one of the authors of the study said in an interview with FierceHealthcare.

“You know it tracks steps or it measures heart rate, but does it prevent obesity? Or does it reduce obesity? Or does it prevent events or conditions related to obesity, like stroke or diabetes and so forth? And that sort of impact; we didn’t find a ton of evidence for that in our selected cohort.”

Authors of the study want more evidence, but are not limiting the apps’ capabilities in coming years. The rise of the technology from nearly nothing a decade ago has been nearly as impressive as the rocket launch of the digital technologies and devices that support the apps’ livelihood. Some of the companies behind the health apps are now expressing interest in conducting clinical trials, the study said.

Mobile health (mHealth) apps continue to transform how health information is accessed. There are two major types of health apps that are most prevalent today: those focused on healthy eating and nutrition and those focused on physical fitness and activity. Other apps are focused on such activities as promoting behaviors like better sleep, positive thinking and smoking cessation.

According to the Health Well Foundation, mHealth apps are used by more than 60 million users in the U.S. There are currently more than 100,000 health apps on the market, but, as the study above shows, it’s not yet possible to determine which are effective and which could even be causing potential harm. Despite this, these apps are expected to exceed $3 billion in global sales by 2019.

How can mHealth apps be effective, the University of Illinois, Chicago asks? “Providing a platform for clear, organized tracking of their health related data.”

Additionally, “organized, user-friendly data tracking makes it easier for mHealth users to set health-oriented goals and track their data as they attempt to achieve them. Whether it’s tracking streaks of consecutive days exercising, or logging consecutive days without using tobacco products, mHealth apps provide users with an instantly-accessible tool where health progressive can be monitored in real time, a means that’s far more rewarding than bi-annual trips to primary care providers.”

If mobile health apps want to move beyond the direct-to-consumer model and enter the formal healthcare space, the study’s authors suggest digital health companies do better at demonstrating the effectiveness of the technology they create. The authors also recommended financial incentives from the government could help in this effort.

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Palm Beach Atlantic’s Tracy Peyton named 2019 Ron Balicki Scholarship recipient

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Tracy Peyton, a senior at Palm Beach Atlantic University, is the recipient of the 2019 Ron Balicki Scholarship,awarded by the Ron Balicki Scholarship Foundation. This scholarship was established to celebrate the legacy of Balicki, the Hall of Fame college and amateur golf writer from Golfweek.

Balicki wrote about the college and amateur game for more than 30 years, delivering stories not only about the players who would become the PGA Tour’s stars of tomorrow but stories about amateurs of all talent levels who simply loved to compete.

Peyton’s golf career began when she was 9 years old. Her parents wanted her to play sports from a young age to instill values that she could carry with her for life. She tried lacrosse, soccer and basketball but to no avail. Peyton’s father introduced her to golf, a game he has played his whole life. Almost immediately, she showed both talent and passion for the game.

Peyton traded her lacrosse stick in for a set of clubs for good in middle school. Over the summer she would play in small tournaments and participate in junior clinics at The Links, a facility of three nine-hole courses near her hometown of Boynton Beach, Florida.

One of Peyton’s fondest memories is getting her first hole-in-one. She was playing in a junior tournament at her home course, Okeeheelee Golf Course. The 120-yard Par 3 featured a creek short right, a sand trap in front of the green, and is surrounded by trees.

“I thinned it,” Peyton said through a laugh.

She didn’t follow it all the way, thinking she should just start marching toward the trees behind the green. She heard it hit the pin but thought it just ricocheted into the woods instead of going in the hole. As Peyton searched for her ball in the woods, she decided to check the cup just in case a miracle happened.

“It was the worst shot in my life, but it turned out great!”

Peyton’s golf career only went up from there. She made the Park Vista High School golf team her freshman year. Her team qualified for the State Championship her Freshman and Sophomore year at Park Vista. Her father was her No. 2 fan.

“My dad loves watching me play,” Peyton said.

It didn’t take long for her dad to realize that all Peyton needed was a short game.

“I couldn’t get up and down to save my life!” Peyton remembered.

Sure enough, Peyton and her father got her short game cleaned up. She wanted to play golf but didn’t want it to take away from her education. It turned out that the best school for her was just down the street. Palm Beach Atlantic gave Peyton an opportunity to combine her two passions while giving her best effort both on and off the course.

“I ended up going to the closest school to my house but it turned out to be a great school.” Peyton said.

Peyton was a member of the Palm Beach Atlantic women’s golf team before becoming editor-in-chief of the university’s student newspaper.

Peyton was the first scholarship athlete recruited by Palm Beach Atlantic to start their women’s golf program.

“Coach Watson made me feel like I was going to make a big difference on the team.” Peyton said, “I was really excited to help springboard the program.”

Unfortunately, Peyton’s collegiate golf career was abruptly cut short by a shoulder injury. Peyton was addressing a ball at practice one day when she immediately felt pain in her right shoulder.

She went to the hospital and visited multiple doctors who cannot seem to diagnose the problem. Although she misses being able to play regularly, Peyton is thankful that the injury happened when it did. She was the managing editor during the 2017-18 school year for The Beacon, Palm Beach Atlantic’s student publication. By no longer being able to play, Peyton has put all of her time and energy into The Beacon and is currently the editor-in-chief.

“I wouldn’t have been able to be editor-in-chief if I was on the golf team. So, this injury was like okay, it’s time to step away from the team. It just made sense. I’m thankful it happened… Everything worked out!” Peyton said after reflecting on her injury.

Peyton isn’t like most college students in the fact that she knows what she wants to do once she graduates.

“I’ve known I’ve wanted to be a journalist since high school… I’ve always known,” Peyton said.

Since she was in elementary school, her parents realized Peyton had a talent for writing. Peyton remembers her parents reading her school essays and encouraging her to write more. Once Peyton began high school, she joined the school newspaper where she was the copy editor.

“I love to tell stories and hear other people’s experiences and how they impact society.”

Ron Balicki’s legacy means something different to everyone that knew him or read his work. To Peyton, his legacy means that no matter what one does, that they do something that they love. The path Balicki paved is something that she is thankful for and something she will never forget as she continues her career in journalism.

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How to stick to a New Year’s exercise resolution

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It’s January, and to many people that means a fresh start, turning over a new leaf, breaking bad habits and making the positive changes we’ve been saying we’re going to make for ages but never quite get around to making.

Increasing the amount of exercise we do is something many people choose to change and for good reason. Exercise is extremely beneficial to our health, both physically and emotionally.

Whether you’re looking to increase your fitness, lose some weight, reduce your stress levels or complete a challenge or event, here are some tips to help you stay on track!

1. Find something you love

Don’t like the gym? Don’t join one! There are so many other ways of keeping fit and exercising.

Try a class; a bootcamp; find a dance group; try your hand at martial arts; go walking or swimming; start up (or return to) a sport.

There’s a form of exercise for everyone. So, if you’ve not found something you enjoy yet, just keep trying new things.

It’s hard enough to get out of the house on a dark cold morning or evening to do something you enjoy, so it’s nearly impossible to do so for something you don’t really like! If you’ve tried the gym or running, for example, before and didn’t last the distance, try something new this time!

2. Do it together

It’s much easier to stick to something if you have a friend or loved one who’s also taking part. You spur each other on, drag each other out of the house when one of you doesn’t want to go and encourage each other to work that little harder. There might even be a healthy dose of friendly rivalry!

Some people love exercising on their own and see it as time to think and de-stress. Others prefer company to make the time pass quicker and make sure they don’t quit!

3. Avoid injury

You can’t keep exercising if you’re injured! As a sports injury therapist I see a lot of people who start a new regime only to become injured within a few weeks.

The main reason for this is doing “too much too soon.” It’s a bit of a cliché but it is very true. When starting a new sport or form of exercise you need to start slowly and have adequate rest.

This is something completely new to your body and it will take time to adapt and develop the strength, endurance and movement patterns required.

Even if you are returning to something you have previously done before, you still need to start slow and at a lower level than where you left off. It is also important to receive some form of instruction from a professional (coach, instructor, etc.) to ensure your technique and equipment are all OK.

4. Support from family/friends

Even if you can’t convince them to join you in your new pastime, family and friends can still help by offering you support and encouragement. Make sure they know how serious you are about it and ask them to help in any small way they can.

For example, just asking how it’s going and being interested (even if it’s faked!) in what you’re doing can really help. Getting them to encourage you to go to your gym/club/group or to go out for a walk/ride/run/swim can be the little push you need.

Working out a schedule with a partner regarding when you’re going to make time for your new pursuit is important. You need to find time around your other commitments and also ensure that they don’t feel put out by you disappearing off in the evenings or shirking your share of the chores. This could lead to a less supportive spouse!

It’s also really helpful if they can tell you any differences they notice in you, be it a little weight loss or that you can walk more without getting out of breath. The fact that someone else has noticed is a great encouragement.

5. Set a goal

Whatever form of exercise you choose to undertake, there are always goals that you can set yourself to keep you going. Having a target helps you to keep interested and working towards something, rather than just going through the motions.

Obviously, there are many events for those into running, cycling, triathlons, etc. But even if your chosen exercise doesn’t have such events, there is always a goal you can set yourself.

For example, to complete an increasing number of lengths in the pool every week; to walk a well-known local route or something further afield; achieve a certain time on your indoor rower for 2,000 or 5,000 meters; or to make the team in your new sport.

If your end goal is a big one and some ways off, then make sure you set smaller goals to meet along the way. For example, if your goal is to run a marathon and you’re currently a 5-10 km runner, add in a couple of events before your marathon attempt, such as a 10-mile race, half-marathon and/or 15- to 20-mile races.

6. Be kind to yourself

So you have a week where you don’t do any exercise. Work’s busy; you’re not feeling great; the kids are playing up… whatever the reason, it doesn’t matter. Life has its ways of disrupting our plans and even the most well-intentioned and ardent exerciser has days, sometimes longer where they just don’t feel up to it.

Don’t beat yourself up about it. Just start again when you are ready. Don’t push yourself to exercise if you don’t feel up to it.

Sometimes our bodies just need to slow down for a few days and recover. If you keep pushing when your body is telling you to rest, you run the risk of burnout and needing longer off your plan.

I hope these tips help you to stick to your New Year’s resolution to exercise more. Whatever your exercise of choice is, I hope 2019 sees you continue with it and reap its benefits!

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6 great state parks for hiking

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Almost all state parks have hiking trails. Many times the trails are great but limited. My ideal state park has multiple trails with variation in the trails so I can hike a longer or difficult trail when I am in the mood or a short and easy trail when I want a short hike.

I am not a hardcore hiker and don’t go on overnight hikes but I sometimes hike a longer hike of several hours. If you enjoy hiking, here are six state parks that are worth a visit.

Lake Superior view at Gooseberry Falls State Park

Gooseberry Falls State Park in Minnesota

The trails in this park have impressive views. The River View Trail (1.25 miles one-way) is easily reached from the campground. One end is a beach on Lake Superior while the other is the Lower and Middle Falls where you can step among the rocks at the falls.

The Gitchi Gimmi Trail (2.5-mile loop) has fabulous views of the lake. The park also has a hiking trail to falls and caves and the park connects to a bike trail along the lake. My favorite hike doesn’t seem to have a name but runs just south and east of the campground along the lake.

Another challenge here is to view all the CCC constructions, which are quite unique in their materials. In the winter the trails are groomed for cross-country skiing. The campsites are nice and private, but there are no hookups at all.

Hocking Hills State Park in Ohio

This used to be a park only known to a few people in Ohio but it has become more popular as more people hear about it. Some of these trails are within walking distance of the campground but most require a drive. They are worth it!

The trails take you to rocky cliffs, waterfalls, and small caves throughout the countryside. Most of the hiking trails are a mile or less. The biking trails are 0.5–7.2 miles long. Old Man’s Cave is the most famous.

However, Ash Cave, Cedar Falls, Conkles Hollow, Rock House, and Cantwell Cliffs are all fun to visit. The campsites here have water, electric, and sewer.

View at Coopers Rock State Forest

Coopers Rock State Forest in West Virginia

The views of Cheat River and the mountains of West Virginia are gorgeous. Raven Rock Trail takes you to a quiet view. The main view is at Coopers Rock but it can be busy on weekends. It can be reached by a short walk from the parking lot.

This area has several fun trails, including the scary-named Rattlesnake Trail. A secret trail exists in this area called Haystack Trail. It’s a very short trail but requires some crawling on rocks. A ranger may be able to help you find it.

The forest trails take you deep in the woods and along streams. The best here is Clay Run Trail to reach the historical Henry Clay Iron Furnace. The trail distances in this park aren’t marked on most maps but are said to be 1-3 miles long for a total of over 50 miles of trails.

In the winter, you can cross-country ski many of the trails. Camping is excellent with electricity available at many sites.

Palo Duro State Park

Palo Duro Canyon State Park in Texas

The hiking trails in this large canyon (2nd largest in the U.S.) are simply superb. I’ve been at the park a couple of times but haven’t been able to hike more than half of the trails.

There are several short trails near the entrance of the canyon that give you an overview of the park. Lighthouse Trail (2.7 miles one-way) has fascinating rock formations along the way that are named or you can make up your own names.

Several hiking trails wind along the stream in the center of the canyon. These trails include historical stops along with interesting rocks. The Rock Garden Trail (2.4 miles one-way) takes you to the top of the canyon.

It’s interesting to see people on their phones at the end of this trail since this is one of the few places in the park with phone service. My favorite hike is the Givens, Spicer, Lowry Trail (3.1 miles).

The coloring of the rocks is wonderful. There are several campgrounds. All have excellent views and most have water and electric.

Canyon Loop Trail

Catalina State Park in Arizona

The Tucson area is great for hiking in general but this is a great place to camp while enjoying hiking within and outside the park. The Romero Ruins Trail (0.75 mile loop) has an archaeological site along with interpretive signs. The Nature Trail (1.0 mile loop) identifies local plants.

The Canyon Loop Trail (2.3-mile loop) has some terrific views of the surrounding hills. My favorite is the Romero Canyon Trail (7.2 miles one-way). The first part to the Romero Pools is challenging enough for me at 2.8 miles one-way but with an elevation gain of 900 feet. The trail after that is even more challenging with an elevation gain of 3,300 feet.

There are several other trails of varied lengths for hiking, biking, or for horses. The park also has some wonderful ranger/volunteer programs. The camping is excellent here with electricity and water hookups.

Hunter Trail view

Picacho Peak State Park in Arizona

The Calloway Trial is short (0.5 miles) but the overlook at the end is well worth the hike. The big trail is the Hunter Trail (1.6 miles one-way). It doesn’t sound like much but the path is steep. Gloves are recommended.

The trail uses steel cables in several places where you need those gloves to pull yourself up. The interesting part of this trail is that you climb for a while to get top of the hill. As you are celebrating, you realize that the trail continues on the back of the hill and on up to the peak.

This second section is even more challenging. Then you have to return. Sunset Vista Trail (3.1 miles) is even longer and the first couple of miles are considered moderate. Gloves are needed on this trail, too. The campground is excellent and the campsites have water.

For all the parks, watch the temperatures. You may want to visit some of these parks in the winter since summer temperatures make hiking unbearable.

Of course, make sure you bring along plenty of water and snacks on these trails and stay safe. What parks do you visit for great hiking?

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6 great state parks for hiking

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Almost all state parks have hiking trails. Many times the trails are great but limited. My ideal state park has multiple trails with variation in the trails so I can hike a longer or difficult trail when I am in the mood or a short and easy trail when I want a short hike.

I am not a hardcore hiker and don’t go on overnight hikes but I sometimes hike a longer hike of several hours. If you enjoy hiking, here are six state parks that are worth a visit.

Lake Superior view at Gooseberry Falls State Park

Gooseberry Falls State Park in Minnesota

The trails in this park have impressive views. The River View Trail (1.25 miles one-way) is easily reached from the campground. One end is a beach on Lake Superior while the other is the Lower and Middle Falls where you can step among the rocks at the falls.

The Gitchi Gimmi Trail (2.5-mile loop) has fabulous views of the lake. The park also has a hiking trail to falls and caves and the park connects to a bike trail along the lake. My favorite hike doesn’t seem to have a name but runs just south and east of the campground along the lake.

Another challenge here is to view all the CCC constructions, which are quite unique in their materials. In the winter the trails are groomed for cross-country skiing. The campsites are nice and private, but there are no hookups at all.

Hocking Hills State Park in Ohio

This used to be a park only known to a few people in Ohio but it has become more popular as more people hear about it. Some of these trails are within walking distance of the campground but most require a drive. They are worth it!

The trails take you to rocky cliffs, waterfalls, and small caves throughout the countryside. Most of the hiking trails are a mile or less. The biking trails are 0.5–7.2 miles long. Old Man’s Cave is the most famous.

However, Ash Cave, Cedar Falls, Conkles Hollow, Rock House, and Cantwell Cliffs are all fun to visit. The campsites here have water, electric, and sewer.

View at Coopers Rock State Forest

Coopers Rock State Forest in West Virginia

The views of Cheat River and the mountains of West Virginia are gorgeous. Raven Rock Trail takes you to a quiet view. The main view is at Coopers Rock but it can be busy on weekends. It can be reached by a short walk from the parking lot.

This area has several fun trails, including the scary-named Rattlesnake Trail. A secret trail exists in this area called Haystack Trail. It’s a very short trail but requires some crawling on rocks. A ranger may be able to help you find it.

The forest trails take you deep in the woods and along streams. The best here is Clay Run Trail to reach the historical Henry Clay Iron Furnace. The trail distances in this park aren’t marked on most maps but are said to be 1-3 miles long for a total of over 50 miles of trails.

In the winter, you can cross-country ski many of the trails. Camping is excellent with electricity available at many sites.

Palo Duro State Park

Palo Duro Canyon State Park in Texas

The hiking trails in this large canyon (2nd largest in the U.S.) are simply superb. I’ve been at the park a couple of times but haven’t been able to hike more than half of the trails.

There are several short trails near the entrance of the canyon that give you an overview of the park. Lighthouse Trail (2.7 miles one-way) has fascinating rock formations along the way that are named or you can make up your own names.

Several hiking trails wind along the stream in the center of the canyon. These trails include historical stops along with interesting rocks. The Rock Garden Trail (2.4 miles one-way) takes you to the top of the canyon.

It’s interesting to see people on their phones at the end of this trail since this is one of the few places in the park with phone service. My favorite hike is the Givens, Spicer, Lowry Trail (3.1 miles).

The coloring of the rocks is wonderful. There are several campgrounds. All have excellent views and most have water and electric.

Canyon Loop Trail

Catalina State Park in Arizona

The Tucson area is great for hiking in general but this is a great place to camp while enjoying hiking within and outside the park. The Romero Ruins Trail (0.75 mile loop) has an archaeological site along with interpretive signs. The Nature Trail (1.0 mile loop) identifies local plants.

The Canyon Loop Trail (2.3-mile loop) has some terrific views of the surrounding hills. My favorite is the Romero Canyon Trail (7.2 miles one-way). The first part to the Romero Pools is challenging enough for me at 2.8 miles one-way but with an elevation gain of 900 feet. The trail after that is even more challenging with an elevation gain of 3,300 feet.

There are several other trails of varied lengths for hiking, biking, or for horses. The park also has some wonderful ranger/volunteer programs. The camping is excellent here with electricity and water hookups.

Hunter Trail view

Picacho Peak State Park in Arizona

The Calloway Trial is short (0.5 miles) but the overlook at the end is well worth the hike. The big trail is the Hunter Trail (1.6 miles one-way). It doesn’t sound like much but the path is steep. Gloves are recommended.

The trail uses steel cables in several places where you need those gloves to pull yourself up. The interesting part of this trail is that you climb for a while to get top of the hill. As you are celebrating, you realize that the trail continues on the back of the hill and on up to the peak.

This second section is even more challenging. Then you have to return. Sunset Vista Trail (3.1 miles) is even longer and the first couple of miles are considered moderate. Gloves are needed on this trail, too. The campground is excellent and the campsites have water.

For all the parks, watch the temperatures. You may want to visit some of these parks in the winter since summer temperatures make hiking unbearable.

Of course, make sure you bring along plenty of water and snacks on these trails and stay safe. What parks do you visit for great hiking?

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Top 5 perks of being a physical therapist

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Some people are fortunate enough to love their jobs. I think that most physical therapists would fall into this category. We are in a great line of work, for many reasons.

Around this time of year, it is important to reflect, be thankful and look forward to what’s to come, so I thought I would write a little lighthearted post to celebrate being a PT!

1. Job Satisfaction

Top of the list has to be job satisfaction. We get to make such a massive difference to so many people’s lives. Whether it’s helping someone to play their sport again; improving their performance; getting someone back to work or even having a positive effect on debilitating pain, it’s such a great feeling to really help someone.

Knowing you’ve made a difference to someone which has helped to improve their movement, pain levels, personal best or quality of life is great. Being able to say, “today at work I made a difference” is a lovely feeling to have.

2. Wide Ranging Opportunities

This line of work can take you almost anywhere! The opportunities range from private practice to professional sports teams, to special educational and disability schools to the armed forces.

You could be employed in a clinic, a hospital, an army base, or a school. You might be self-employed and either visit clients in their own homes or set up your own clinic. Not many occupations have such a wide reach in terms of possibilities and there’s one out there to suit us all.

3. Flexible Hours

Who doesn’t love flexible working? Whilst this may vary depending on the setting in which you are employed, not many therapists work standard office hours.

Yes, this means we may have to work some evening or weekend shifts, but hey, the shops are quieter on a Monday morning anyway, right? As is the gym. Hooray for avoiding the after-work gym rush!

4. Free Treatments

If you are lucky enough to work with colleagues you may even be getting some free treatment. I know I do!

We offer up free treatments to each other when necessary, knowing the favor will be repaid somewhere along the line. You might even squeeze this into your working day if you both have a little spare time. Yet another perk!

5. Chatting to Clients

I love a good chin wag and many longer-term clients become like friends. They come in for their treatment and we have a good natter whilst I’m working on them.

It becomes like going to work to see your friends, which is a lovely thing to do. Especially when your “friends” pay you and bring you all manner of gifts! I’ve had everything from fresh produce from their gardens, eggs, clothes, chocolates, an ordinance survey map and the odd bottle of wine at Christmas!

These are my top five perks. I’m sure there are plenty more that I haven’t thought of and they will be different for everyone. Whatever your favorite parts of your PT job are, I’m sure there aren’t many other professions out there that can match it!

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Top 5 perks of being a physical therapist

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{summary}

Some people are fortunate enough to love their jobs. I think that most physical therapists would fall into this category. We are in a great line of work, for many reasons.

Around this time of year, it is important to reflect, be thankful and look forward to what’s to come, so I thought I would write a little lighthearted post to celebrate being a PT!

1. Job Satisfaction

Top of the list has to be job satisfaction. We get to make such a massive difference to so many people’s lives. Whether it’s helping someone to play their sport again; improving their performance; getting someone back to work or even having a positive effect on debilitating pain, it’s such a great feeling to really help someone.

Knowing you’ve made a difference to someone which has helped to improve their movement, pain levels, personal best or quality of life is great. Being able to say, “today at work I made a difference” is a lovely feeling to have.

2. Wide Ranging Opportunities

This line of work can take you almost anywhere! The opportunities range from private practice to professional sports teams, to special educational and disability schools to the armed forces.

You could be employed in a clinic, a hospital, an army base, or a school. You might be self-employed and either visit clients in their own homes or set up your own clinic. Not many occupations have such a wide reach in terms of possibilities and there’s one out there to suit us all.

3. Flexible Hours

Who doesn’t love flexible working? Whilst this may vary depending on the setting in which you are employed, not many therapists work standard office hours.

Yes, this means we may have to work some evening or weekend shifts, but hey, the shops are quieter on a Monday morning anyway, right? As is the gym. Hooray for avoiding the after-work gym rush!

4. Free Treatments

If you are lucky enough to work with colleagues you may even be getting some free treatment. I know I do!

We offer up free treatments to each other when necessary, knowing the favor will be repaid somewhere along the line. You might even squeeze this into your working day if you both have a little spare time. Yet another perk!

5. Chatting to Clients

I love a good chin wag and many longer-term clients become like friends. They come in for their treatment and we have a good natter whilst I’m working on them.

It becomes like going to work to see your friends, which is a lovely thing to do. Especially when your “friends” pay you and bring you all manner of gifts! I’ve had everything from fresh produce from their gardens, eggs, clothes, chocolates, an ordinance survey map and the odd bottle of wine at Christmas!

These are my top five perks. I’m sure there are plenty more that I haven’t thought of and they will be different for everyone. Whatever your favorite parts of your PT job are, I’m sure there aren’t many other professions out there that can match it!

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